How to Build a Better Body & Brain on a Low-Oxalate Diet

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When

Tuesday, January 18th | 6:30 to 8:30PM

Location

In The Beet at Ellwood’s

Instructor

sallynortonheadshotSally K. Norton, MPH, is a health consultant with decades of public health experience presenting nutrition and wellness topics.  Currently, she is self-employed and leads a monthly educational support group for people using the low-oxalate diet to alleviate chronic health problems.  Her “lectures are almost perfection” says 90-year-old Bill Shada.  Sally also writes a blog at www.sallyknorton.com.

Sally’s career history includes designing research studies, grant proposal writing, research administration at VCU Medical School; educating health professions faculty and students about holistic, alternative, and integrative healing practices at UNC-Chapel Hill Medical School; creating a guide for buying meats from local grass-based farms; health promotion in the inner city; research on health issues and health programs for elderly people in rural communities in North Carolina; and teaching a variety of health and nutrition classes.

Additional information and testimonials are available on Sally’s website at www.sallyknorton.com.

Description

Come hear an ironic and unexpected nutrition story– that popular solutions to health problems may be dangerous to our health.  Prevailing dietary wisdom from every camp (vegan to paleo) promotes high-oxalate foods as healthy despite the well-documented role oxalates play in kidney disease, in neurotoxicity, and in pain or inflammatory syndromes.  By changing what you eat you can reverse pain, prevent kidney stones, improve your digestion, heal old injuries, improve your brain function, sleep better, and age more gracefully.  Come learn how you can build a better body and brain with the low-oxalate diet, and finally feel good.

This presentation will raise awareness of the toxic effects of dietary oxalates, their power to cause many common and mysterious health problems, and the therapeutic benefits of a low oxalate diet. Speaker Sally K. Norton, MPH draws on personal experience, case studies, and extensive medical research to educate the audience with a captivating and entertaining delivery that is both information-packed and well-paced. The fact that many of today’s heavily promoted “health foods” contain high levels of this naturally occurring toxin puts many more people at risk now for oxalate toxicity. Yet, the significance of dietary oxalate poisoning has thus far escaped the attention of medical science and the healing arts. Norton’s call for dietary change, and the help she can provide to those who suffer, are vital and timely.

A rich set of visual aids will be used to convey the story and the science, and to expedite understanding and retention. The first half of the session is about dietary oxalates and health: what oxalates are, how they can affect your cells and accumulate in your body, and what foods naturally contain them. The second half of the session offers a brief overview of the steps needed to successfully shift food choices to reduce their exposure to toxic oxalate. Samples of low-oxalate foods will be provided.

This program will introduce participants to a powerful, although generally ignored, dietary tool for reclaiming our natural ability to alleviate a wide variety of health problems that are prevalent today.

In addition to these programs, Sally also offers a monthly Support & Study Group for those that adopt the low-oxalate diet.  Here is the invite, if you’re interested in joining.

Admission

$16 after Jan 15th.

Capacity

45

Register for class

There is limited seating/availability for all classes so we encourage you must register ahead of time to reserve your seat!


Build a Better Body & Brain on a Low-Oxalate Diet



Questions?

Call the customer service desk at 804-359-7525.

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